Saturday, February 17, 2007

HOW TO CALCULATE NHL STATS

NHL CALCULATIONS

HOW TO FIGURE

OT-SO GOALIE STATS
If one team wins in overtime by a 1-0 score.The goalie that got the win is credited with the shutout.But if it goes to a shootout.Both goaltenders on both teams are awarded the shutout.And the 1-0 score is decided for the win and secondary point.

GOALIE WHO LOSES IN SHOOTOUT
The losing goalkeeper will not be charged with the extra goal against.

Assist
An assist is awarded to the player or players (maximum of two) who touched the puck prior to the goal, provided no defender plays or possesses the puck in between.

Game Played
A player receives credit for playing in a game if: i) he steps on the ice during time played or; ii) serves any penalty.

Game-Winning Goal
After the final score has been determined, the goal which leaves the winning Club one goal ahead of its opponent is the game-winning goal (example: if Team A beats Team B 8-3, the player scoring the fourth goal for Team A receives credit for the game-winning goal).

Game-Tying Goal
The final goal in a tie game.

Goal
A goal is awarded to the last player on the scoring Club to touch the puck prior to the puck entering the net.

Goals-Against Average
Multiply goals allowed (GA) by 60 and divide by minutes played (MINS).

Goaltender
A goaltender receives a win, tie or loss if he is on the ice when either the game-winning or game-tying goal is scored.

Penalty-Killing Pct.
Subtract total number of power-play goals allowed from total number of shorthanded situations to get total number of power-plays killed. Divide the total number of power-plays killed by the total number of shorthanded situations.

Plus-Minus
A player receives a "plus" if he is on the ice when his Club scores an even-strength or shorthand goal. He receives a "minus" if he is on the ice for an even-strength or shorthand goal scored by the opposing Club. The difference in these numbers is considered the player's plus-minus statistic.

Power-Play Goal
A goal scored by a Club while it has a manpower advantage due to an opponent's penalty.

Following are some examples of what is and is not considered a power-play goal:
--- if a Club has an advantage on a minor penalty starting at 2:02 of the period and it scores at 4:02, the goal is not a power-play goal.
---if a Club scores on a delayed penalty, the goal is not a power-play goal.
---if a Club has an advantage due to a five-minute major or match penalty, that Club is always credited with having one more advantage than the number of power-play goals it scores during that advantage, because the penalty does not expire. A new advantage begins after each power-play goal. For example, if Team A scores three goals during a major penalty, it is credited with four advantages.
---if a Club is on a power-play for any length of time, it is considered to have had an advantage.
---if a minor penalty is incurred by a Club on a power-play due to a major penalty, a new advantage is given to that Club when its minor penalty expires, provided the opponent's major penalty is still in effect.

Power-Play Percentage
Total number of power-play goals divided by total number of power-play opportunities.

Save Percentage
Subtract goals allowed (GA) from shots against (SA) to determine saves. Then divide saves by shots-against.

Shooting Percentage
Divide the number of goals scored by the number of shots taken.

Shorthand Goal
A goal scored by a Club while it is at a manpower disadvantage. The same cases apply for shorthand as for power-play goals, but in the opposite manner.

Shot on Goal
If a player shoots the puck with the intention of scoring and if that shot would have gone in the net had the goaltender not stopped it, the shot is recorded as a "shot on goal."

Shutout
If two goaltenders on the same team combine for a shutout, neither receives credit for the shutout. Instead it is recorded as a Club shutout.

Tenths of a Second
If a penalty or goal occurs in the last minute, the time is rounded off to the previous second (ex: if a penalty is called with 12.4 seconds left in a period, the time is indicated as 19:47 and not 19:48.).


NHL Stats Explained
Know your PIM from your GT. An explanation of NHL stats & all hockey statistics.
By Jamie Fitzpatrick, About.com Guide

The NHL stats sheet can be confusing for new fans. Some numbers are obvious - most of us can guess what "G" or "A" indicate. But "SPCT" is likely to be mystery. And how many fans can figure out a goalie's save percentage or goals-against average? The confusion ends here. This quick list of hockey stat sheet abbreviations and explanations will help you survive the season.

POS
Player position. The possible positions are C (center), LW (left wing), RW (right wing), D (defense) or G (goaltender).
NO
Player jersey number.
GP
Games Played.
G
Goals. A goal is awarded to the last player on the scoring team to touch the puck prior to the puck entering the net.Note: Goals scored during a shootout do not count towards a player's goal total.
A
Assists. An assist is awarded to the player or players (maximum of two) who touch the puck prior to the goal, provided no defender plays or possesses the puck in between.
P or PTS
Points. The sum total of goals and assists.
+/-
Plus-minus. See an explanation of plus minus.
PIM
Penalty minutes.
PP
Power play goals.
SH
Short-handed goals.
GW
Game-winning goals. After the final score has been determinded, the goal which leaves the winning team one goal ahead of its opponent is the game-winning goal (example: if Team A beats Team B 8-3, the player scoring the fourth goal for Team A receives credit for the game-winning goal).Note: Goals scored during a shootout are not credited as game-winning goals.
S
Shots on goal. If a player shoots the puck with the intention of scoring and if that shot would have gone in the net had the goaltender not stopped it, the shot is recorded as a shot on goal.
PCT or SPCT
Shooting percentage. Divide the number of goals scored by the number of shots taken.
ESP
Points scored at even strength.
SHP
Points scored while short-handed.
PPP
Points scored on the power play.
HmP
Points scored on home ice.
RdP
Points scored on the road.
DvP
Points scored against teams within the division.
ODvP
Points scored against teams outside the division.
P/G
Average points scored per game.
SHFT
Average number of shifts per game.
ATOI
Average time on ice per game.
FW
Faceoffs won.
FL
Faceoffs lost.
FWP or FWPCT
Percentage of faceoffs won.

Rule 84 - Overtime
84.1 Overtime – Regular-season - During regular-season games, if at the end of the three (3) regular twenty (20) minute periods, the score shall be tied, each team shall be awarded one point in the League standings.
The teams will then play an additional overtime period of not more than five (5) minutes with the team scoring first declared the winner and being awarded an additional point. The overtime period shall be played with each team at a numerical strength of four (4) skaters and one (1) goalkeeper. Additional penalties to be assessed consistent with the rules in regulation time.
The overtime period will be commenced immediately following a one (1) minute rest period during which the players will remain on the ice. The teams will not change ends for the overtime period. Goalkeepers may go to their respective players’ benches during this rest period, however, penalized players must remain on the penalty bench. Should a penalized player exit the penalty bench during this rest period, he shall be returned immediately by the officials with no additional penalty being assessed, unless he commits an infraction of any other rule.
84.2 Overtime – Regular-season – Extra Attacker - A team shall be allowed to pull its goalkeeper in favor of an additional skater in the overtime period. However, should that team lose the game during the time in which the goalkeeper has been removed, it would forfeit the automatic point gained in the tie at the end of regulation play, except if the goalkeeper has been removed at the call of a delayed penalty against the other team. Should the goalkeeper proceed to his bench for an extra attacker due to a delayed penalty call against the opposing team, and should the non-offending team shoot the puck directly into their own goal, the game shall be over and the team that was to be penalized declared the winner.
Once the goalkeeper has been removed for an extra attacker in overtime during the regular-season, he must wait for the next stoppage of play before returning to his position. He cannot change “on the fly.” If he does, a bench minor penalty shall be assessed for having an ineligible player.
84.3 Overtime – Regular-season – Penalties – When regulation time ends and the teams are 5 on 3, teams will start overtime 5 on 3. Once player strength reaches 5 on 4 or 5 on 5, at the next stoppage of play, player strength is adjusted to 4 on 3 or 4 on 4, as appropriate.
When regulation ends and teams are 4 on 4 teams will start overtime 3 on 3.
If at the end of regulation time teams are three (3) skaters on three (3) skaters, overtime starts three (3) skaters on three (3) skaters. Once player strength reaches five (5) skaters on four (4) skaters or five (5) skaters on five (5) skaters, at the next stoppage player strength is adjusted to four (4) skaters on three (3) skaters or four (4) skaters on four (4) skaters, as appropriate.
At no time will a team have less than three players on the ice. This may require a fifth skater to be added if a two-man advantage occurs.
Refer to Reference Tables – Table 19 – Penalties In Effect Prior to the Start of Overtime – Regular Season.
If a team is penalized in overtime, teams play four (4) skaters against three (3) skaters. If both teams are penalized with minor penalties at the same stoppage of play (with no other penalties in effect), teams will play three (3) skaters against three (3) skaters.
In overtime, if a team is penalized such that a two-man advantage is called for, then the offending team will remain at three (3) skaters while the non-offending team will be permitted a fifth skater.
At the first stoppage of play after the two-man advantage is no longer in effect, the numerical strength of the team will revert back to either four (4) skaters on four (4) skaters or a four (4) skaters on three (3) skaters situation, as appropriate.
Refer to Reference Tables – Table 20 – Penalties Assessed in Overtime – Regular Season.
84.4 Shootout - During regular-season games, if the game remains tied at the end of the five (5) minute overtime period, the teams will proceed to a shootout. The rules governing the shootout shall be the same as those listed under Rule 24 - Penalty Shot.
The teams will not change ends for the shootout. The home team shall have the choice of shooting first or second. The teams shall alternate shots.
Three (3) players from each team shall participate in the shootout and they shall proceed in such order as the Coach selects. All players are eligible to participate in the shootout unless they are serving a ten-minute misconduct or have been assessed a game misconduct or match penalty.
Guidelines related to stick measurement requests during the shootout are outlined in 10.7 – Stick Measurements – Prior to Shootout Attempt.
Once the shootout begins, the goalkeeper cannot be replaced unless he is injured. No warm up shall be permitted for a substitute goalkeeper.
Each team will be given three shots, unless the outcome is determined earlier in the shootout. After each team has taken three shots, if the score remains tied, the shootout will proceed to a "sudden death" format. No player may shoot twice until everyone who is eligible has shot.  If, however, because of injury or penalty, one team has fewer players eligible for the shootout than its opponent, both teams may select from among the players who have already shot. This procedure would continue until the team with fewer players has again used all eligible shooters.
Regardless of the number of goals scored during the shootout portion of overtime, the final score recorded for the game will give the winning team one more goal than its opponent, based on the score at the end of overtime.
The losing goalkeeper will not be charged with the extra goal against. The player scoring the game-winning goal in the shootout will not be credited with a goal scored in his personal statistics.
If a team declines to participate in the shootout procedure, the game will be declared as a shootout loss for that Team. If a team declines to take a shot it will be declared as "no goal."
84.5 Overtime – Playoffs – In the Stanley Cup Playoffs, when a game is tied after three (3) twenty (20) minute regular periods of play, the teams shall take a normal intermission (fifteen (15) minutes) and resume playing twenty (20) minute periods, changing ends for the start of each overtime period. The team scoring the first goal in overtime shall be declared the winner of the game.